WHAT’S IN A NAME

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It seems that Shakespeare is accredited with the question “What’s in a name.”  Romeo and Juliet are not allowed to marry, because they come from rival families.

Juliet cries, “’Tis but thy name that is my enemy…what’s Montague?  It is nor hand, nor foot, nor arm, nor face, nor any other part belonging to a man, O, be some other name.  What’s in a name?  That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet…give up your name for it is no part of you.”

From birth my name has been Fayrene Clark, but seldom was Fayrene used.  I have always only been Faye, until I married at the age of seventy-seven.  Then, the one syllable Faye did not sound right with the name Reese, so I decided to use Fayrene, for to me, Fayrene Reese just rolled off the tongue more readily.

I spent four days in the hospital last week.  Never have I heard so many comments about my name.  What a beautiful name!  Your name is so unusual!  I’ve never heard that name!  Where did it come from?

When my mother was pregnant with me, she read the name in a newspaper.  Fayrene was a Hollywood starlet.  I assume she never became a star or this name would have been better known.  In any case, when Mama gave birth, in spite of the counsel of my six year old brother, who wanted to name me Patsy after his little black bull dog, she named me Fayrene.

Once in a while I meet someone named Faye, but never in my life have I met a Fayrene.  I must admit that I rather like having an unusual name.  Never having heard of it, even my computer redlines Fayrene.

At birth, my sister was given the name Mary Jane.  However, some clerk, in the registrar’s office, inadvertently changed it to Mary June on the birth certificate.  So, for the rest of her life, my sister is Mary June, or Junie, or June bug.  That was easier than going through some bureaucratic hassle.  I can’t imagine it any other way.  “Jane” just doesn’t fit.

The days for Mary and John, and the like, are, I fear, long past for the most part.  Now couples name their babies APPLE and RYDER and HARPER.

A mother brought her child into the doctor’s office where my niece worked.  Her baby’s name was ENAMEL.  She pronounced it EN’-A-MEL.  Asked where she got that name, she answered, “I saw it on a paint can.”

In the town where my brother lived, there was a family by the name of DUCK.  They were older, when they gave birth to a baby boy.  They weren’t excited about the child, so they refused to name him.  Left up to the doctor, he named the child DONALD.  DONALD DUCK!   The boy was always a little strange, and later committed suicide.

I don’t really know to what degree a child and his development are influenced by the name he is given at birth, but I do know that names are important, and perhaps we should give serious thought to a decision that will last a lifetime.

A name is like a “Life Label.”  It is more than letters strung together, traditional or made-up.  That name becomes a symbol for the person you are and the person you will become as life unwinds.  That name wraps itself around its owner, and the whole of his life including his character, his demeanor, his attitude, his integrity, his relationships, his honor, his kindness, or lack of it, are tied up in that name.

Henry was one of my fourth graders.  Wherever his name was mentioned on campus, everyone laughed or groaned, for they knew what an incorrigible child he was—always angry, defiant and unmanageable.  His name and reputation were one and the same.

When I married Cecil, he suggested I keep my name instead of taking his.  “Everyone knows who Faye Clark is,” he said, “but no one will know who Fayrene Reese is.”He was concerned for my ministry, for my name and my ministry were inextricably linked together.  We compromised, and I became Fayrene Clark-Reese.

MY NAME AND REPUTATION ARE ONE AND THE SAME!  I need to remember that, for Fayrene has another name.  I am called “CHRISTIAN” meaning that I am a follower of Jesus Christ, and as such I am expected, by Christ and those around me, to live a Christ like life.  Whether I like it or not, people are watching me.  They see the way I conduct myself.  They hear my words and are aware of my attitude.  They know whether or not I am a person of integrity, whether I am kind and gentle.

Not long ago I heard someone say, “You never have to wonder what Fayrene is thinking.”

I have decided that was not necessarily a compliment.  When my name is mentioned, people know, to some degree, the kind of person I am.  My name gives me away.

King Solomon wrote, in Proverbs 22:1, “A good name is to be chosen rather than riches.”

Mama gave me my name, but I am the one who must choose that it be a good name.

Remember, the sun will come out tomorrow!